Town of Cary elections 2019: What to know before you vote

Updated Oct. 9: Ya Liu and Harold Weinbrecht won the two contested races and the parks and transportation bonds passed.

Friday, Oct. 4, is the last day of early voting, which you can do at any of these sites.

Requesting an absentee ballot? Do that by this upcoming Tuesday, Oct. 1, before 5 p.m. Here’s that form.

Not sure if you’re registered or your info is up to date and live in Wake County? Check it on this site.

Part of Cary is in Chatham County, and those residents have early voting too, here and a sample ballot here.

FIND OUR FULL RALEIGH VOTER GUIDE HERE

What to know about the Cary Town Council elections

Cary Town council holds four-year terms, which is longer than Raleigh’s two-year terms. That means for this election, Cary residents will vote for mayor and one at-large seat, and vote on representation if you’re in district B or D

However, the incumbent at-large candidate is running unopposed, as is the district B representative. District D has three candidates, the most crowded field. 

The News & Observer has a candidate guide here and those with campaign sites are linked below:

TOWN OF CARY MAYORAL CANDIDATES:

Dero-Asha Davis-Weeks 

Harold Weinbrecht (incumbent)

TOWN OF CARY TOWN COUNCIL AT-LARGE CANDIDATE

Lori Bush (incumbent, unopposed)

TOWN OF CARY TOWN COUNCIL DISTRICT B 

Don Frantz (incumbent, unopposed)

TOWN OF CARY TOWN COUNCIL DISTRICT D 

Beth Friedrich

Ken George (incumbent)

Ya Liu

What to know about the Parks & Transportation bonds

All Cary voters will decide on two bonds, as well: One for parks and one for transportation. These bonds are general obligation bonds, which are often used to fund public projects by cities and towns. 

The parks bond, for $112 million, would fund parks projects including $50 million for the second phase of the Downtown Park (this is where the fountain is, and next to the new Cary Regional Library that opens in early November).

The Downtown Park would grow to seven acres, with a “Great Lawn,” walking trails connecting outdoor “rooms” to gather, a kids’ play area, a dog park and more.

Other projects would include two new parks in West Cary, acquiring land for open space preservation, work to preserve historic properties, replacing aging playground equipment, improving greenways and other park facilities. 

The transportation bond is for $113 million. The two biggest projects include:

Enhancements around NCDOT projects for $23 million, mostly around pedestrian- and bike-related improvements. 

$22.3 million for traffic improvements in and around the Fenton development, a 92-acre mixed-use development project. Read about more projects in the bond here.

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